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International Education Week Events

Thursday, November 07, 2013
LAWRENCE — Offices across the University of Kansas have planned events in observance of International Education Week for the week of Nov. 11- 15. Initiated in 2000 by the U.S. departments of State and Education, International Education Week is dedicated to celebrating the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide.
Monday, Nov. 11
International Education Week Kickoff
10 a.m.-10:45 a.m.
Strong Hall Rotunda
Thomas Heilke, dean of graduate studies, will make a presentation followed by a reading of the 2013 International Education Week Proclamation. Cookies and cider will be provided.
Sponsored by the Office of International Programs
 
Tuesday, Nov. 12
Brownbag Event: “LGBT Issues in Russia”
Noon-1 p.m.
318 Bailey Hall
Presented Eve Levin, history, and Renee Perelmutter, Slavic Languages & Literatures
Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies (CREES)
 
World at KU: Celebrating International Students, Scholars and Professors at KU
4 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Kansas Union, Ballroom
Sponsored by International Student Services
 
Sexuality and Cultural Change: The Presentation of Gender and Body in Iranian Cinema with Dr. Kamran Talattof
5:30 p.m.
Kansas Union, Centennial Room
Talattof will discuss Iranian cinema, analyze imbedded cinematic codes and investigate how films are composed. This will foster a better understanding of Iranian society, which has experienced agonizing periods of change. The history of film corresponds with how gender is constructed and how sexuality is allowed to be expressed.
Presented by the Center for Global and International Studies
 
Dinner of Abrahamic Traditions – Early Thanksgiving Dinner
7 p.m.-8:30 p.m.
St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church
From a Jewish, Christian and Islamic perspective. Sponsored by the Dialog Institute of the Southwest, St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, Ecumenical Campus Ministries and Intercultural and Interfaith Dialog Student Association
RSVP by Saturday, Nov. 9.
“This is How You Lose Her “ – Junot Diaz Book Discussion
7 p.m.
Lawrence Public Library, Library Event Space
Join the discussion over the book and its related issues, led by Professor Marta Caminero-Santangelo, whose area of research are U.S. Latino literature and issues of race, ethnicity, citizenship and human rights; and 20th-century American women's literature. 
Sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
 
Romantic Epicenter, works by Dvořák, Schumann and Brahms
7:30 p.m.
Lied Center of Kansas
Five of the world's most talented musicians from The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Take a musical journey with some of the greatest composers of the Romantic Era. Tickets range from $11-24. Sponsored by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center
 
Science on Tap: The Fantastic Flora of South Africa
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Free State Brewing Co.
Presented by Botanist Mark Mort, who will lead a discussion about the amazing plant life of this region, how it evolved to be so diverse and threats to its survival.
Sponsored by the KU Natural History Museum
 
Wednesday, Nov. 13
 
Global Food for Thought
12:15-1:15 p.m.
318 Bailey Hall
Free admission and free chickpea stew and rice lunch
Presentation by Ebenezer Obadare, associate professor of sociology.
Sponsored by the Center for Global and International Studies
 
Study Abroad Info Session: Costa Rica
3:30 p.m.
203 Lippincott
Sponsored by the Office of Study Abroad
 
Waggoner Research Colloquium
4 p.m.
Kansas Union, Malott Room
The Waggoner Research Colloquium celebrates the ongoing creation of scholarship about Latin America by KU faculty. The interdisciplinary panel will discuss “Brazilian Citizenship and National Identity: Music and Politics.” Invitation only. Sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
 
Study Abroad Student Panel
7 p.m.
Sabatini Multicultural Resource Center
Returned students will answer any and every question you've ever had about studying abroad. Learn everything you've always wanted to know about studying abroad but have been too afraid to ask.
Sponsored by the Office of Study Abroad
 
World Fashion Show
7 p.m.-10 p.m.
Kansas Union, Ballroom
The language of fashion is universal and inspirational. Every culture across the world expresses itself in some way through what its members wear.
Free for KU students, faculty and staff with valid KU ID, $5 for general public
Co-sponsored by Student Union Activities and the Center for Global & International Studies
 
“Catastrophe 1914”: WWI Lecture with Sir Max Hastings, journalist and author
7:30 p.m.-9 p.m.
Lied Center Pavilion
Hastings gives vivid accounts of the battles and frank assessments of generals and political leaders, and shows why it was inevitable that the first war among modern industrial nations could not produce a decisive victory, resulting in a war of attrition.
Co-sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities, European Studies Program, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies
 
Thursday, Nov. 14
What’s in a Protest? Trees, Shopping Malls and Authoritarianism: From Turkey to Syria, a discussion of upheaval in the Middle East
Noon-1 p.m.
706 Fraser Hall
Professor Elif Andac, sociology
Sponsored by the Department of Sociology
 
“Writing War: Civil Conflict and Memory” with Aminatta Forna, novelist
5 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
Hall Center conference hall
Discussion about her upcoming novel, “The Hired Man,” which takes place in a Croatian town affected by the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s.
 
Film Screening: “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?”
 5 p.m.
 Spencer Museum of Art, Auditorium
This sweet rom-com shown in the 2013 Tribeca Film Fest tells the story of Weichung, a young, soft-spoken optometrist in Taiwan, who  finds himself questioning his marriage and re-examining his past gay life when he is attracted to a handsome flight attendant who comes in to be fitted for a pair of glasses. The film gives viewers an affectionate and nonjudgmental look at Taiwan’s gay scene and includes several enchanting fantasy elements.
Co-sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the Confucius Institute
 
Making the Global Local: Climate Policy in U.S. Cities
5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
369 Regnier Hall, Edwards Campus
Presented by Assistant Professor Rachel Krause, public affairs & administration

Friday, Nov. 15
 
Friday Night at the Kino: “100 Minuta Slave (100 Minutes of Glory)”
7 p.m.-9 p.m.
318 Bailey Hall
Croatian film with English subtitles.  
Sponsored by CREES
 
Ongoing
 
Spencer Museum of Art
Diego Teo: International Artist-in-Residence
(Through Jan. 5, 2014)
During his residency Teo will create original work inside the gallery space, and his progress and process will be visible to the public during regular museum hours. Teo defies simple categorization. Often using found objects and including communities in his creative process, the artist merges site-specific performance with multimedia installation to create participatory environments. His work also blends social engagement with historical understanding in ways that respond trenchantly to local concerns. Teo draws on global themes of cultural identity, inequality, historical memory, political violence, immigration, exclusion and dispossession.

LAWRENCE — Offices across the University of Kansas have planned events in observance of International Education Week for the week of Nov. 11- 15. Initiated in 2000 by the U.S. departments of State and Education, International Education Week is dedicated to celebrating the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide.

Monday, Nov. 11

International Education Week Kickoff
10 a.m.-10:45 a.m.
Strong Hall Rotunda
Thomas Heilke, dean of graduate studies, will make a presentation followed by a reading of the 2013 International Education Week Proclamation. Cookies and cider will be provided.
Sponsored by the Office of International Programs
 
Tuesday, Nov. 12
Brownbag Event: “LGBT Issues in Russia”
Noon-1 p.m.
318 Bailey Hall
Presented Eve Levin, history, and Renee Perelmutter, Slavic Languages & Literatures
Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies (CREES)
 
World at KU: Celebrating International Students, Scholars and Professors at KU
4 p.m.-5:30 p.m.

Kansas Union, Ballroom
Sponsored by International Student Services
 
Sexuality and Cultural Change: The Presentation of Gender and Body in Iranian Cinema with Dr. Kamran Talattof
5:30 p.m.

Kansas Union, Centennial Room

Talattof will discuss Iranian cinema, analyze imbedded cinematic codes and investigate how films are composed. This will foster a better understanding of Iranian society, which has experienced agonizing periods of change. The history of film corresponds with how gender is constructed and how sexuality is allowed to be expressed.
Presented by the Center for Global and International Studies
 
Dinner of Abrahamic Traditions – Early Thanksgiving Dinner

7 p.m.-8:30 p.m.

St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church

From a Jewish, Christian and Islamic perspective. Sponsored by the Dialog Institute of the Southwest, St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, Ecumenical Campus Ministries and Intercultural and Interfaith Dialog Student Association

RSVP by Saturday, Nov. 9.
 
“This is How You Lose Her “ – Junot Diaz Book Discussion

7 p.m.
Lawrence Public Library, Library Event Space

Join the discussion over the book and its related issues, led by Professor Marta Caminero-Santangelo, whose area of research are U.S. Latino literature and issues of race, ethnicity, citizenship and human rights; and 20th-century American women's literature. 
Sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
 
Romantic Epicenter, works by Dvořák, Schumann and Brahms

7:30 p.m.

Lied Center of Kansas

Five of the world's most talented musicians from The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Take a musical journey with some of the greatest composers of the Romantic Era. Tickets range from $11-24. Sponsored by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center
 
Science on Tap: The Fantastic Flora of South Africa

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Free State Brewing Co.

Presented by Botanist Mark Mort, who will lead a discussion about the amazing plant life of this region, how it evolved to be so diverse and threats to its survival.
Sponsored by the KU Natural History Museum
 
Wednesday, Nov. 13
 
Global Food for Thought
12:15-1:15 p.m.

318 Bailey Hall
Free admission and free chickpea stew and rice lunch
Presentation by Ebenezer Obadare, associate professor of sociology.
Sponsored by the Center for Global and International Studies
 
Study Abroad Info Session: Costa Rica
3:30 p.m.

203 Lippincott
Sponsored by the Office of Study Abroad
 
Waggoner Research Colloquium
4 p.m.
Kansas Union, Malott Room
The Waggoner Research Colloquium celebrates the ongoing creation of scholarship about Latin America by KU faculty. The interdisciplinary panel will discuss “Brazilian Citizenship and National Identity: Music and Politics.” Invitation only. Sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
 
Study Abroad Student Panel
7 p.m.
Sabatini Multicultural Resource Center
Returned students will answer any and every question you've ever had about studying abroad. Learn everything you've always wanted to know about studying abroad but have been too afraid to ask.
Sponsored by the Office of Study Abroad
 
World Fashion Show
7 p.m.-10 p.m.

Kansas Union, Ballroom
The language of fashion is universal and inspirational. Every culture across the world expresses itself in some way through what its members wear. Free for KU students, faculty and staff with valid KU ID, $5 for general public
Co-sponsored by Student Union Activities and the Center for Global & International Studies
 
“Catastrophe 1914”: WWI Lecture with Sir Max Hastings, journalist and author
7:30 p.m.-9 p.m.
Lied Center Pavilion
Hastings gives vivid accounts of the battles and frank assessments of generals and political leaders, and shows why it was inevitable that the first war among modern industrial nations could not produce a decisive victory, resulting in a war of attrition.
Co-sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities, European Studies Program, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies
 
Thursday, Nov. 14
 
What’s in a Protest? Trees, Shopping Malls and Authoritarianism: From Turkey to Syria, a discussion of upheaval in the Middle East
Noon-1 p.m.

706 Fraser Hall
Professor Elif Andac, sociology
Sponsored by the Department of Sociology
 
“Writing War: Civil Conflict and Memory” with Aminatta Forna, novelist
5 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

Hall Center conference hall
Discussion about her upcoming novel, “The Hired Man,” which takes place in a Croatian town affected by the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s.
 
Film Screening: “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?”

5 p.m.
 Spencer Museum of Art, Auditorium
This sweet rom-com shown in the 2013 Tribeca Film Fest tells the story of Weichung, a young, soft-spoken optometrist in Taiwan, who  finds himself questioning his marriage and re-examining his past gay life when he is attracted to a handsome flight attendant who comes in to be fitted for a pair of glasses. The film gives viewers an affectionate and nonjudgmental look at Taiwan’s gay scene and includes several enchanting fantasy elements.
Co-sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the Confucius Institute
 
Making the Global Local: Climate Policy in U.S. Cities

5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

369 Regnier Hall, Edwards Campus
Presented by Assistant Professor Rachel Krause, public affairs & administration

 
Friday, Nov. 15
 
Friday Night at the Kino: “100 Minuta Slave (100 Minutes of Glory)”
7 p.m.-9 p.m.

318 Bailey Hall
Croatian film with English subtitles.  
Sponsored by CREES
 
Ongoing
 
Spencer Museum of Art
Diego Teo: International Artist-in-Residence
(Through Jan. 5, 2014)
During his residency Teo will create original work inside the gallery space, and his progress and process will be visible to the public during regular museum hours. Teo defies simple categorization. Often using found objects and including communities in his creative process, the artist merges site-specific performance with multimedia installation to create participatory environments. His work also blends social engagement with historical understanding in ways that respond trenchantly to local concerns. Teo draws on global themes of cultural identity, inequality, historical memory, political violence, immigration, exclusion and dispossession.
 

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